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Massachusetts neighborhood terrorized by troublesome turkeys

A flock of troublesome turkeys is gobbling up a quiet New England neighborhood.

The aggressive birds have been pecking away at locals in Woburn, Massachusetts, even chasing cars down the street and trapping terrified residents inside their vehicles, according to a report Monday by local CBS News.

“The most aggressive one is Kevin,” said resident Meaghan Tolson. “Then there are three ladies because their coloring isn’t so distinct. It’s Esther, Gladys and Patricia. Even if you are parked, Kevin will try to get in your car.

“You have to open your passenger side door and lure them over there, then make a clean break to the house,” Tolson said.

Residents near Nashua and Tremont streets in the city of 40,000 people say no one is spared from the wrath of the combative turkeys, who have been known to go after everyone from kids on bicycles to locals ducking behind their front doors.

“There have been times when I’m trapped in my car and can’t get out and have to call family members,” resident April Drolette told the station. “They usually bring an umbrella. It takes a team.”

Residents of Woburn, Massachusetts are reportedly being harassed by aggressive wild turkeys.
Residents of Woburn, Massachusetts are reportedly being harassed by aggressive wild turkeys.

The birds have even trapped people inside their cars.
The birds have even trapped people inside their cars.

According to experts, the behavior could be due to people feeding the turkeys.
According to experts, the behavior could be due to people feeding the turkeys.

David Scarpitti, turkey and upland game project leader with Mass Wildlife, told CBS the problem likely stems from residents feeding the birds, which could convince the turkeys that humans are part of their flock — prompting them to assert their dominance.

The birds could also be reacting to seeing their reflections in car doors, he said.

“Turkey behavior starts to kick in where they become so habituated with people that they are not really seeing that distinction,” Scarpitti said. “It’s all about how they respond to the turkeys. If you turn away, now you are subdominant.

“He just won that battle,” he added.

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